Tel Aviv: City Guide

➔ British Airways World Traveller Plus, Boeing 777, LHR-TLV
➔ The Savoy Hotel Tel Aviv Sea Side
Tel Aviv: City Guide
➔ Dan Lounge, Terminal 3 Concourse E, TLV
➔ British Airways World Traveller Plus, Boeing 777, TLV-LHR

As my hotel was more or less in the centre of the main drag in Tel Aviv, I decided to spilt my time there between the South and North side of the city.

On the first day, I explored the old part of Tel Aviv. Which in hindsight, probably wasn’t the best way around to do things. Being a Saturday, it was Shabbat, which is the Jewish day of rest. This lasts from a few minutes before sunset on Friday until the appearance of three stars on Saturday night. Therefore a few areas weren’t as active as they could have been!

The areas mentioned in this part are reachable on foot. Although on both days I was in the city, I walked a good 8 miles or so per day. There is a separate foot and bike path along the beach, so walking in this area isn’t an issue. Also around the city are numerous sign posts, highlighting areas of interest.

Day 1

Obviously, my experience here is personal to me. Your results may vary depending on what you’re into.

If you’re staying near to the beach, turn left as you’re facing the sea in order to reach the Jaffa area of the city.

Once you reach Jaffa (you’ll know because the land juts out into the sea), if you’re anything like me, you’ll be looking for a bite to eat.

There are a number of cafes/restaurants in this area from cheap and cheerful to a little more upmarket. A place I found tucked away was Cafe SAGA. Whilst it wasn’t the cheapest place I’ve ever eaten at (£16 for a coffee and a sandwich), what I did have was great.

Next up, it was off to explore the area. The main highlights are Hashan Square, The Jaffa Clock Tower, Mahmoudiya Mosque and the flea market.

The final stop for me in this part of the city, was Ha-Pisga Park. This area offers some great views across Tel Aviv. The views across the old port however weren’t quite as impressive.

Day 2

The second day of my visit didn’t have quite as good weather. Although at least the wind had died down considerably. This time around, I made a right turn upon reaching the sea.

There weren’t quite as many areas of interest in this area of town. Following the same path that runs along the beach, the first area you reach is the Spiegel Park.

Which then leads into Independence Park once you pass the Hilton.

As you round the end of the park, cross the main road on to the avenue which is ahead of you. After a short walk, you’ll hit “Tel Aviv High Street”. Or as its more officially known, Dizengoff Street. This is a leafy road lined with shops that reminded me a little of Paulista Avenue in Sao Paulo.

Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv

Once you hit Dizengoff Square, you’re within touching distance of CafeLix. Whilst the cafe itself isn’t anything too special, the coffee was one of the best I have had. And at £6 for a coffee and cake, comparable prices to the UK.

Tel Aviv

After you’ve finished at CafeLix, its a short walk to the Dizengoff Centre, which is a fairly large shopping centre. It was just a short walk back to the hotel from here.

Tel Aviv

Coffee not your thing? Not too far from CafeLix is Brooklyn Pizza. A large American style slice and a drink set me back just under £7 that evening.

Tel Aviv

Heading back along King George Street, if you still have room, you’ll find Cremerie De L’eclair. Situated in the shadow of the Dizengoff Centre, it offers a range of weird and wonderful ice cream sandwiches.

Tel Aviv

As the Carmel Market was closed when I visited on Saturday, I made a slight detour to include it when heading out on Sunday evening.

Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv

Street Art

Dotted around many areas of the city are various forms of street art. From murals to more elaborate displays, keep your eyes peeled!

Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv

No Cash Needed

During my time in Tel Aviv, I didn’t need cash once. Card was widely accepted. Although it should be noted that every transaction I made was via the older swipe method. It appeared that chip and pin had yet to make it to the country. Although there was the contactless symbol in a few places, it was never used. This wasn’t a huge issue though. If you do get caught out, there are a number of cash machines around however.

Don’t Fancy Walking?

There are a number of bus routes and taxis in Tel Aviv. Although I can’t comment too much about them as I didn’t use them! The city seemed to be fairly well covered though. Most, if not all taxis had a Gett banner on too, app based rides are possible.

Getting Online

Finally, if you’re based in the UK, I would highly recommend getting a Three sim card. Israel is included as one of their Go Roam destinations, meaning you can use your phone as you would in the UK at no extra cost. Failing this, there did appear to be a public WiFi network throughout central Tel Aviv. So if you get lost, it shouldn’t be too difficult to fire up Google Maps!

Tel Aviv

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